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Research in Practice resources 2016-17

delivery programme Published: Jun 2017

Research in Practice resources 2016-17

RiP

Our Work 2016-17

The Research in Practice Our Work 2016-17 resource reviews our year in practice.

It contains an overview of key themes we have focused on from April 2016 – March 2017, as well as links to relevant learning materials including publications, workshops, webinars, research and policy updates, legal summaries and blogs. It also details bespoke projects we have worked on and other support available for our Partners and non-partners alike.

Individuals can use the publication to map specific materials to their learning and development needs, as well as a guide to Research in Practice resources.

Neglect: Mapping Resource (open access)

delivery programme Published: May 2017

Neglect: Mapping Resource (open access)

Ofsted have announced a series of 2017 joint targeted inspections, with a focus on the effectiveness of local area, multi-agency interventions for children between 7 and 15 years old who have experienced, or are at risk of, neglect.

This selection of resources is intended to support the sector to build evidence-informed learning and development pathways in relation to child neglect. We welcome enquiries on building practice development programmes focused on this issue. Please contact ask@rip.org.uk for further information.

Aimed at: Leaders, managers and practitioners in Children's Services; practitioners engaged in direct work with children, young people and families, across the multi-agency safeguarding workforce.

This PDF download is an open access resource.

Reflective supervision: Resource Pack (2017)

practice tools and guides Published: Apr 2017

Reflective supervision: Resource Pack (2017)

Good reflective supervision facilitates safe practice with children and families.

This package of resources provides a summary of research evidence on reflective supervision alongside learning from practice, and tools to use in one to one and group supervision sessions.

The tools have been designed to support:
• Contracting
• Running group supervision
• Audit
• Critical thinking and analysis
• Emotional resilience
• Recording



These resources are the outputs of a Research in Practice Change Project.

Aimed at: Staff with supervisory responsibilities across early help, targeted support and statutory services with children and families.

Devolution and its implications for leaders of child and family services: Leaders' Briefing (2017)

leaders briefings Published: Apr 2017

Devolution and its implications for leaders of child and family services: Leaders' Briefing (2017)

Devolution provides the opportunity for doing things differently and thinking creatively about how services can work together. However, implementation also brings its challenges.

This briefing explores the issues raised at the joint RiP and RiPfA Leaders' Forum in June 2016, which provided an opportunity for leaders to reflect on their role within the devolution agenda and consider the implications for children's and adult social care.

Aimed at: Directors, Assistant Directors and strategic managers.

Number of pages: 20
Preview available.
Product code: CH-LBR-007

Building child and family resilience - boingboing's resilience approach in action: Frontline Briefing (2017)

frontline resources Published: Apr 2017

Building child and family resilience - boingboing's resilience approach in action: Frontline Briefing (2017)

In recent research, the link between social deprivation and families’ involvement with child and family services has been made starkly evident. The Child Welfare Inequalities project has found that children in the most deprived ten per cent of neighbourhoods in the UK are at least ten times more likely to be in care than children in the least deprived ten per cent, and 24 times more likely to be on a child protection register.

This briefing seeks to build practice approaches to building resilience in the context of the social deprivation that is the experience of these families. It introduces a Resilience Framework and Tool developed by Angie Hart and collaborators at boingboing, a learning community of researchers, practitioners, students, parent carers and young people, who share a passion to tackle the problems that affect the most under-resourced children and families.

Aimed at: Practitioners engaged in direct work with children, young people and families, as well as supervisors and team managers of those engaged in direct work.

Number of pages: 20
Preview available

Care leaver transitions: Strategic Briefing (2017)

strategic briefings Published: Apr 2017

Care leaver transitions: Strategic Briefing (2017)

This briefing presents the latest research and practice evidence on how to provide the best quality support to care leavers. It highlights innovative and cost-effective approaches to enable evidence-informed local policy making, service redesign and commissioning.

The emerging policy landscape of different transition pathways for young people not in further education, employment or training (NEET), is also explored, along with their entitlements.

Aimed at: Assistant Directors, heads of service, anyone who commissions or provides commissioned services in this area.

Number of pages: 16
Preview available.
Product code: CH-SBR-010

The impacts of abuse and neglect on children; and comparison of different placement options: Evidence Review (open access)

evidence scopes Published: Mar 2017

The impacts of abuse and neglect on children; and comparison of different placement options: Evidence Review (open access)

Commissioned by the Department for Education and developed by Research in Practice, this open access paper reviews research on the impacts of abuse and neglect and the strengths and weaknesses of care placement options. It is intended to support local authority and judicial decision-makers to develop a shared understanding of research and make decisions that lead to stable and positive placements for children and young people.

Aimed at: All those involved in family court work, care planning and placement decisions.

Number of pages: 113

This PDF download is an open access resource.

Contact after adoption: Learning Resources (open access)

practice tools and guides Published: Mar 2017

Contact after adoption: Learning Resources (open access)

The type and frequency of contact a child has with their birth family needs careful consideration and planning, and should be determined by the needs and best interests of the child, both in the long and short term.

This open access website provides resources for practitioners in making evidence-informed post-adoption contact plans and supporting birth relatives and adopters through contact and planning for their child.

The resources cover:


Each section contains:
  • Research briefings and practical tools for training and working with families.
  • Exercises and case studies to consolidate learning.
  • Video and audio testimonies from children, birth and adoptive families on contact and support.

‘Contact: making good decisions for children in public law’, was a joint project between Research in Practice and the University of East Anglia which brought together practitioners from local authorities and national organisations to work with Professor Elsbeth Neil and independent social worker Polly Baynes to develop these resources.

Aimed at: Those involved in making, reviewing and supporting plans for post-adoption contact.

These learning resources are open access.

Go to the contact after adoption website.

Young person-centred approaches in CSE - promoting participation and building self-efficacy: Frontline Briefing (2017)

frontline resources Published: Feb 2017

Young person-centred approaches in CSE - promoting participation and building self-efficacy: Frontline Briefing (2017)

Enabling children and young people’s participation is a fundamental aspect of protecting them, amplifying their voices and challenging the cultures of silence in which abuse flourishes. This briefing builds on the findings and recommendations for effective service design and practice development highlighted within our Working effectively to address Child Sexual Exploitation: Evidence Scope (2015). It explores how to work with risk and the perceived ‘choices’ of young people affected by child sexual exploitation, in order to build resilience, self-efficacy and involve young people in decision-making about their care.

Accompanying the briefing is a checklist tool containing a set of questions and prompts to use when planning group-based participatory activities with young people affected by child sexual exploitation.

Please note. This resource was first published in July 2016. Please note that in 2017 the government issued an updated definition of child sexual exploitation to be used for the purposes of the statutory Working Together guidance. The new definition states that:

Child sexual exploitation is a form of child sexual abuse. It occurs where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child or young person under the age of 18 into sexual activity (a) in exchange for something the victim needs or wants, and/or (b) the financial advantage or increased status of the perpetrator or facilitator. The victim may have been sexually exploited even if the sexual activity appears consensual. Child sexual exploitation does not always involve physical contact; it can also occur through the use of technology.
(Department for Education, 2017)

This new guidance was commissioned by the Department for Education and is based on a review of the evidence by the University of Bedfordshire and Research in Practice. The extended text is available as an open access resource - www.rip.org.uk/cse-practice-tool

The document should be read in conjunction with Working together to safeguard children: A guide to inter-agency working to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, which provides the statutory framework for responding to child sexual exploitation and all other forms of abuse - www.bit.do/working-together

Aimed at: Principal Social Workers, Heads of Service and service managers for children and families, practitioners in social work and youth offending, youth workers, advocacy and IRO services, residential home workers and foster carers, school welfare leads.

Number of pages: 24
Preview available.

Young person-centred approaches in CSE - promoting participation and building self-efficacy: Frontline Tool (2017)

frontline resources Published: Feb 2017

Young person-centred approaches in CSE - promoting participation and building self-efficacy: Frontline Tool (2017)

Enabling children and young people’s participation is a fundamental aspect of protecting them, amplifying their voices and challenging the cultures of silence in which abuse flourishes. This briefing builds on the findings and recommendations for effective service design and practice development highlighted within our Working effectively to address Child Sexual Exploitation: Evidence Scope (2015). It explores how to work with risk and the perceived ‘choices’ of young people affected by child sexual exploitation, in order to build resilience, self-efficacy and involve young people in decision-making about their care.

This tool accompanies the briefing. It is a checklist tool containing a set of questions and prompts to use when planning group-based participatory activities with young people affected by child sexual exploitation.

Please note. This resource was first published in July 2016. Please note that in 2017 the government issued an updated definition of child sexual exploitation to be used for the purposes of the statutory Working Together guidance. The new definition states that:

Child sexual exploitation is a form of child sexual abuse. It occurs where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child or young person under the age of 18 into sexual activity (a) in exchange for something the victim needs or wants, and/or (b) the financial advantage or increased status of the perpetrator or facilitator. The victim may have been sexually exploited even if the sexual activity appears consensual. Child sexual exploitation does not always involve physical contact; it can also occur through the use of technology.
(Department for Education, 2017)

This new guidance was commissioned by the Department for Education and is based on a review of the evidence by the University of Bedfordshire and Research in Practice. The extended text is available as an open access resource - www.rip.org.uk/cse-practice-tool

The document should be read in conjunction with Working together to safeguard children: A guide to inter-agency working to safeguard and promote the welfare of children, which provides the statutory framework for responding to child sexual exploitation and all other forms of abuse - www.bit.do/working-together

Aimed at: Principal Social Workers, Heads of Service and service managers for children and families, practitioners in social work and youth offending, youth workers, advocacy and IRO services, residential home workers and foster carers, school welfare leads.

Number of pages: 6
Preview available.

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