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Beyond Referrals: supporting schools to address harmful sexual behaviour

In this blog, the International Centre for researching child sexual exploitation, violence and trafficking at the University of Bedfordshire introduce a toolkit to support schools to address harmful sexual behaviour.

Safeguarding adolescents in Waltham Forest

The service response to vulnerable adolescents had always appeared to us to be full of contradictions and paradoxes, but it was the findings of the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Exploitation in Rotherham that acted as a trigger for Waltham Forest to fundamentally review and change its approach to safeguarding adolescents. This blog outlines the challenge for the system and how Waltham Forest drove improvements with the support of a framework provided by Research in Practice.

Understanding the impact of online sexual abuse

6 November 2017, Research in Practice Admin

Given that relatively little is known about the impact of sexual abuse involving online and digital technology compared to offline abuse, the NSPCC recently commissioned researchers from the universities of Bath and Birmingham to explore and compare how online and offline sexual abuse impacts upon young people and how professionals respond to it. The report reveals some issues that need to be addressed in order to fully understand and represent the experiences of children and young people in the development of services.

In tackling exploitation and abuse, we can never stop learning and questioning

27 October 2017, Research in Practice Admin

Improving our prevention of and response to child sexual exploitation (CSE) requires not just hard work and tenacity, but a willingness to engage with evidence. It is easy to be evidence-based when you agree with the messages, but when research challenges established practice, it takes real grit to reflect critically on what we do.

Why disorganised attachment isn’t always an indicator of abuse

23 October 2017, Research in Practice Admin

Assessment of disorganised attachment in young children is often used to screen for child abuse. However, disorganised attachment isn’t necessarily an indicator of abuse. Evidence shows that exposure to multiple socio-economic risks is almost as likely to result in disorganised attachment, and therefore the classification alone shouldn’t be used to guide child protection decisions.

How do multiple disadvantages affect children’s quality of life?

6 September 2017, Research in Practice Admin

The latest Good Childhood Report from the Children’s Society presents new insights into how multiple disadvantages affect wellbeing in children and young people. It also exposes gender differences in children’s subjective wellbeing in areas such as happiness with appearance or relationships with friends, and considers some of the possible reasons for these.

Workforce perspectives on harmful sexual behaviour – what are practitioners saying?

How do professionals describe their knowledge, skills and experience in relation to supporting children and young people with Harmful Sexual Behaviour? What are the challenges and what works well to build capacity in this field of work?

Improving engagement with fathers in Newport

Newport has been working to evaluate and improve the way they engage and include fathers in work with children and families. Paul Cryer discusses their initial audit and findings, the steps they have taken to promote and embed engagement with fathers, and helpful tips for practice.

Improving social work practice with Gypsy and Traveller communities

Every year the number of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller children placed in care rises. It is becoming increasingly important to examine how professionals within Children’s Services interact with these communities and how this can affect the support offered to children and their families.

You can’t grow roses in concrete – why whole system reform is needed to support frontline change in child protection casework

The Munro Review of Child Protection has resulted in reduced bureaucracy and new autonomy for Children’s Social Care Departments that allows for the needs of children, young people and their families to take centre stage. How is the sector adjusting to this newfound independence to regain the professional confidence to make judgements and decisions? And why is whole system reform of an organisation crucial to support changes in frontline child protection practice?

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