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The Good Childhood Report - Does gender affect happiness?

12 November 2018, Research in Practice Admin

The Children's Society recently published the 2018 edition of the Good Childhood Report. In this blog, Senior Researcher Larissa Pople outlines the latest statistics from the report which offers new insights into how gender can affect a child's wellbeing.

Growing interest and emerging evidence – how and why adolescent neglect is climbing the safeguarding agenda

In this blog, Phil Raws from The Children’s Society discusses how and why adolescent neglect is climbing the safeguarding agenda due to a range of emerging evidence.

Effective strategic partnerships with the voluntary sector: messages from research and practice

In the face of rising demand and shrinking resources, local authorities are looking for new ways of delivering services for children and families. As a result, new types of delivery and relationships between the public and voluntary sectors are emerging.

Strengthening social work through evidence-informed practice

20 November 2017, Research in Practice Admin

Shelley Caldwell, Principal Social Worker at North Somerset Council, discusses key messages from the Link Officers’ Annual Meeting and the importance of strengthening social work through research evidence, professional practice wisdom and children, young people and families expertise.

Understanding the impact of online sexual abuse

6 November 2017, Research in Practice Admin

Given that relatively little is known about the impact of sexual abuse involving online and digital technology compared to offline abuse, the NSPCC recently commissioned researchers from the universities of Bath and Birmingham to explore and compare how online and offline sexual abuse impacts upon young people and how professionals respond to it. The report reveals some issues that need to be addressed in order to fully understand and represent the experiences of children and young people in the development of services.

Why disorganised attachment isn’t always an indicator of abuse

23 October 2017, Research in Practice Admin

Assessment of disorganised attachment in young children is often used to screen for child abuse. However, disorganised attachment isn’t necessarily an indicator of abuse. Evidence shows that exposure to multiple socio-economic risks is almost as likely to result in disorganised attachment, and therefore the classification alone shouldn’t be used to guide child protection decisions.

Building social capital to support young people into employment, education and training

18 September 2017, Research in Practice Admin

Is it possible to prevent young people from becoming NEET (not in employment, education or training) after leaving school, by providing them with practical experiences of the world of work in order to increase their social capital? A recent European-wide project ran pilots in Portugal, Spain and Italy to test out this theory.

Improving social work practice with Gypsy and Traveller communities

Every year the number of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller children placed in care rises. It is becoming increasingly important to examine how professionals within Children’s Services interact with these communities and how this can affect the support offered to children and their families.

Reflective supervision: the cornerstone of good social work practice

Reflective supervision underpins good practice with children and families. Like other children’s social care and family support roles, social work is a demanding and challenging job – in order for us to really understand the context of the child's daily lived experience we need to think about many complex and competing issues. Good quality reflective supervision supports us to do this, helping us to find a way through any 'analysis paralysis' to develop our practice knowledge, skills and wisdom; make difficult decisions and ultimately keep children safe.

‘Looking out for Lottie’ – how award winning online simulation is improving child protection training on child sexual exploitation

The Centre for Child Protection (CCP) at the University of Kent has developed innovative work into the use of serious game simulations to upskill professionals into complex and difficult aspects of child protection practice. These simulations have also been developed to help children and young people protect themselves from online and face-to-face grooming.

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