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County lines and criminal exploitation – what, why and what does it look like?

Organised crime groups are increasingly using county lines as a business model to transport and sell drugs. Vulnerable children and young people with adverse childhood experiences are particularly susceptible to this type of exploitation. In this blog, SPACE describe what county lines can look like.

Supervision to safeguard children in education

Successful supervision encourages professional curiosity and development, offering a formal platform for supportive discussions to take place. In this blog, Penny Sturt and Jo Rowe introduce findings from a pilot scheme which used supervision to support staff who safeguard children in schools.

Stop the clock

28 January 2019, Research in Practice Admin

How can we prevent young carers undertaking inappropriate or excessive care? What are the challenges, evidence and actions needed to ensure we are not relying upon children and young people to provide care? Sara Gowen from Sheffield Young Carers shares their work.

Transitional safeguarding from adolescence to adulthood

‘Transition’ is a process or period of changing from one state to another. Within some aspects of social care, in particular safeguarding, the notion of transition can imply a definitive ‘line in the sand’ where assumptions about capacity change overnight and eligibility for safeguarding support is very different depending which side of this line a person falls.

21st century social work with children and young people with disabilities

Helen Wheatley, editor of the latest Research in Practice Evidence Review, details learning on social work practice, research and emerging findings regarding the support available to disabled children, young people and their families.

Understanding the impact of online sexual abuse

6 November 2017, Research in Practice Admin

Given that relatively little is known about the impact of sexual abuse involving online and digital technology compared to offline abuse, the NSPCC recently commissioned researchers from the universities of Bath and Birmingham to explore and compare how online and offline sexual abuse impacts upon young people and how professionals respond to it. The report reveals some issues that need to be addressed in order to fully understand and represent the experiences of children and young people in the development of services.

Why disorganised attachment isn’t always an indicator of abuse

23 October 2017, Research in Practice Admin

Assessment of disorganised attachment in young children is often used to screen for child abuse. However, disorganised attachment isn’t necessarily an indicator of abuse. Evidence shows that exposure to multiple socio-economic risks is almost as likely to result in disorganised attachment, and therefore the classification alone shouldn’t be used to guide child protection decisions.

Improving engagement with fathers in Newport

Newport has been working to evaluate and improve the way they engage and include fathers in work with children and families. Paul Cryer discusses their initial audit and findings, the steps they have taken to promote and embed engagement with fathers, and helpful tips for practice.

Improving social work practice with Gypsy and Traveller communities

Every year the number of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller children placed in care rises. It is becoming increasingly important to examine how professionals within Children’s Services interact with these communities and how this can affect the support offered to children and their families.

You can’t grow roses in concrete – why whole system reform is needed to support frontline change in child protection casework

The Munro Review of Child Protection has resulted in reduced bureaucracy and new autonomy for Children’s Social Care Departments that allows for the needs of children, young people and their families to take centre stage. How is the sector adjusting to this newfound independence to regain the professional confidence to make judgements and decisions? And why is whole system reform of an organisation crucial to support changes in frontline child protection practice?

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